Posts tagged ‘library 2.0’

User 2.0: Innovative Library Sites (Part 1 – Academic Libraries)

You may recognize this illustration from the work published in Diffusion of Innovations (1995) by the late Everett Rogers. A few weeks ago I posted a query on the dig_ref listserv asking this savvy group of librarians interested in virtual reference services to nominate the library sites that are the most “innovative” in terms of integrating Web 2.0 / social software applications. I have also incorporated sites discussed in programs I attended at ALA Mid-Winter in Seattle (January 2007), suggested by colleagues, or noted in listservs or journal articles.

Today I am posting the preliminary list of Innovative Academic Libraries from these sources. Eash listing also has a very brief note about social software applications featured by the library’s website. I would like to thank David M. Dragos, Ph.D. student at Rutgers SCILS and Lynn Silipigni Connaway of OCLC for their help in compiling this list.

Again, this list is preliminary and not meant to be exhaustive, but rather to start a discussion. They are in alphabetical order.

I would like to invite you to leave a comment if your academic library is an innovator or if you know of others!

My next post (within the next day or so) will be Part 2 – Innovative Public Libraries.

Innovative Academic Library Websites

February 20, 2007 at 9:18 pm 12 comments

Topics in Librarianship: Social Software Literacy Course and ‘Top 25 Web 2.0 Search Engines’

Following up on our (Janie Herman and Robert Lackie) “The Latest and the Coolest–Technology Librarians Can Use” presentation and discussions at the Rutgers University MLIS Colloquium last night, I spoke with Assistant Professor Steve Garwood there about his upcoming course, “Topics in Librarianship: Social Software Literacy,” starting this summer.

We are always trying to highlight what Web 2.0 enthusiasts and experts are doing to help teach librarians and other information professionals how they can take advantage of this “software and information/communication medium,” and Steve’s course certainly fits the bill!

Steve has graciously allowed us to link to his draft version of the syllabus, giving us an idea of what will be covered and leading us to some interesting reading resources and the required equipment/software.

I thought this information and resources might spur on those of us who are might be thinking of offering a similar course or a series of workshops on “how technology is used in society to communicate information, ideas, practices, thoughts, and opinions and how this creates new communities and learning environments,” so I was glad that he was willing to share. Here are his objectives thus far:
* Identify and use popular social technologies for information collection, management, dissemination and collaboration.
* Discuss the historical and theoretical understanding of technologies of collaboration. * Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of technology on information services and instruction for diverse audiences.
* Explain what Web 2.0/Library 2.0 is – how it is different from the “regular” WWW, and why that shift is important to libraries & librarians;
* Generate ideas for the use of social software & programs at libraries and information agencies to improve services and to help staff work more effectively.

Sound interesting? Take a look at his entire draft syllabus here.

Also, one of his library school students emailed him very recently about the Web 2.0 topic that Steve and I think Library Garden readers will appreciate, too: The Online Education Databases’ “Top 25 Web 2.0 Search Engines,” published two days ago on their site. I really liked several of the mashup and Rich Internet Application Search Interfaces (RIAs) examples and descriptions, but visual search, social software, and audio/visual search examples are also provided.

Don’t you just love how librarians and library school students are willing to share?! Enjoy!

February 8, 2007 at 11:15 am

Blogging Live from Rutgers SCILS

Robert and I are here at Rutgers SCILS talking about all things 2.o and having a great time!
Marie Radford is here as well so it is a Library Garden reunion. Watch this space for links from the talk!

——————————————————————————
Hello again to everyone who attended our session last night –
the
first of several for Course 502 MLIS Colloquium (Spring 2007).
We were honored to be asked to speak and even more honored that so many people turned out on a sub-zero night to hear us talk.

As promised, here is a list of links from the talk. We would be interested in your feedback so please leave us comments or feel free to email us.

A Few Flickr’ing Libraries (and examples of what libraries can do with Flickr):

Flickr Groups for Librarians (especially those from NJ):

YouTube Must Sees:

We mentioned a lot of blogs and most (if not all) can be found on our blogroll, so take a peek at who we have listed and start reading. In particular, last night we focussed on Tame The Web and blyberg.net as well as the Ann Arbor District Library web site.

Two of the wikis mentioned last night included the Subject Guides at SJCPL and Princeton’s BookLovers wiki as well as the various wikis being put in to place for conferences. I meant to mention, but it slipped my mind, Library Success: A Best Practices Wiki. If you want to have a chance to play with a wiki and contribute content, this wiki is a great place to start.

Here also is the link to Robert’s article (in case you need it for future reference) and to the CJRLC Technology Group blog that has the list of links from their January 16th meeting.

I will end this post just as we ended our talk, by linking to the Web Trend Map created by Information Architects [pictured above]. As they say on their site:

The iA Trend Map shows all the big players, the current Internet trends and how they’re connected, using the Tokyo Metro map. It’s totally unscientific and almost useless, but definitely fun to look at.

Also make sure you read the 50 Loudest Web Sites of 2006 report and look at their Internet 2007 Predictions.

Note: I think that is everything that we promised to provide links to for future reference. If I forgot something let me know. Or if we mentioned something and you want more details, drop us a line.

February 7, 2007 at 8:04 pm 3 comments

Amazing (short) Web 2.0 Video

By way of Boing Boing

Check out this amazing video,”Web 2.0… the Machine is Us/ing Us,” created by Michael Wesch, Assistant Cultural Anthropology Professor at Kansas State University.

What a great way to kick off the first 5 minutes of any web 2.0 workshop or discussion!

February 6, 2007 at 9:47 pm 4 comments

2/8/07 Teleconference: 15 Minutes a Day!: All It Takes to Keep Up in a 2.0 World

Stephen Abram is dong a one-hour “teleconference on learning faster,” entitled “15 Minutes a Day! All It Takes to Keep Up in a 2.0 World with Stephen Abram” this coming Thursday, February 8th at 11 AM ET for librarians “who want to learn more about keeping up with the vast amount of information and change in our 2.0 world.” Sound interesting? Go to his blog post for more information and to register, and see the excerpt below to get you even more interested!:

“Stephen shares his techniques and tips for keeping up and increasing the capacity of library staff to add tools, resources, learning and insights. Learn about 2.0 and add tricks to your kitbag of processes and techniques for keeping up with important changes and opportunities.
The Benefits:
Learn:
- Tips & techniques for keeping up with the tsunami of information
- Tools for enhancing capacity to sort through information
- Pointers for determining which trends and pieces of information are important for the library world
- Some of the top trends that our speaker [Abram] is watching”

February 5, 2007 at 12:47 pm

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