Posts filed under ‘Web 2.0’

Twittering about Second Life

Monday I got this e-mail from my director:

Those of us at the Futures conference heard about the increasing rate of change
and how technology is central to it. So, do any of you read the Sunday Star
Ledger? If you do, did you notice the articles on pages 2 and 3 of the first
section (not buried somewhere) – Twitter and Second Life. When things like this
become news that’s prominently placed, you HAVE to sit up and take notice.

True, this past Sunday’s Star Ledger carried articles about Twitter and Second Life (actually, there were two about Second Life, there was also this one). Well those are the ones I found online, I didn’t actually see the print paper.

While I’m certainly not a “Twitter celebrity” I have discovered that Twittering is kinda’ fun. The first time I heard about it I thought it was ridiculous and didn’t even sign up for it – even though I am a major “joiner”! ;-) However, when a friend invited me to join and be his friend, I did it and then found out that getting little messages about what he was doing was kinda neat and fun. Then I added another friend. It also became fun to post little tidbits about what I was doing (you are limited to 140 characters). I am by no means “addicted” or “obsessed,” but it is fun.

The article calls Twitter a “booming new social networking site,” “micro-blogging,” “addictive and may just be the future of communication.” People are using it to find like-minded friends and connections without all the “noise” of MySpace. Especially funny tweets become popular and their posters gain visibility.

One day when I checked the public timeline I saw people posting to each other who were at some kind of conference and checking-in to say when/where/what they were doing – making plans about where to meet up and when to eat, etc….

At the Futures Conference Ray Kurzweil talked about things doubling very quickly. Well, according to one of the founders of Twitter, its users are doubling every three weeks!

Check out Twitter Map and Twitterholic if you’re into it.

As for Second Life, the first article offers a sort of “travel guide” to it with tips and a warning that “sex is everywhere,” hence the second article about someone offering child pornography there.

Again, I am not a big user of Second Life. I did eventually sign up but have only been “virtual” once. I just fumbled and stumbled around and ended up getting stuck on a fence somewhere. However, Second Life has more than 6 million registered participants (according to the article) and I have seen some interesting things on useful applications and results from Second Life. Of course, there is a library there and many “real world” things take place there – concerts, buying and selling, advertising, building or creating things, meet people, own land, etc..

Maybe I should give it another try. If anyone knows how to get off that darn fence in Second Life, Twitter me!

May 15, 2007 at 8:36 am 6 comments

A Serendipitous Stumble: Social Computing Magazine

I was just surfing around looking for information on several topics for a variety of reasons when I came across Social Computing Magazine and had to share my serendipitous find.

Actually, I did not find the site directly but rather the article Wikis, Collective Intelligence and Libraries written by Laura B. Cohen. The article challenges academic librarians to create more subject-based wikis and to collaborate with students in order to take advantage of the collective intelligence of students and to keep their sites current. I think that public libraries should also be trying to harness the collective intelligence of their community via the use of wikis and this article gave me some great food for thought for a future post on this topic.

It is hard to tell how long the “magazine” has been around — I would say no more than two months given the dates of the articles in their online archives and the fact that some of the topics have yet to be written about. The articles and topics on the site look promising, but when I went to the message boards it seems as if they are just getting going with them.

While I was exploring, I read the article on The Blogger’s Code of Conduct and bookmarked it separately for future reference and use in blogging classes … oh, and though it took some doing, I finally discovered the crucial information I was wanting to know — who is the person/people behind this venture. I finally found it at the bottom of the article Is ‘Social Computing” a Breakthrough — or an Oxymoron?

Jeremy Geelan is Founder, Publisher, and Editor-in-Chief of Social Computing Magazine. He blogs at The New Web Blog and is Executive Director of The Social Computing Foundation.

It will be interesting to keep tabs on this in the months to come.

Edited to add:

Jeremy Geelan emailed me today to thank me for the positive review (and it is a positive review, I found the content useful and the overall site design easy to navigate). My one complaint about not easily finding the information about who was behind the site was a lot more visible than I originally thought — I will blame it on the fact that I was posting late on a Sunday night after spending the day in the garden and chasing after my toddler ;-)

In any event, here is some text from the email Jeremy sent that will help clear up the issue:


… As to prime movers, there is one other link on the SCM main page that would have helped you, at the bottom left: http://www.socialcomputingmagazine.com/editboard.cfm . We probably need to move that up above the fold, but we wanted content to come first, and personalities onl a distant second.

Between them, these guys are some of the most forward-thinking, savvy minds involved anywhere in and on the Web today. I am just the (lucky) conductor… they each play their instruments far better than I ever shall!

Thanks for the good thoughts,…and don’t forget, either, that SCM is a participatory site, so the more folks become involved the merrier: http://www.socialcomputingmagazine.com/submitnews.cfm

I for one plan to become involved and encourage others in the biblioblogosphere to do the same and give a librarian voice to this new venture.

Thanks for emailing me Jeremy!

April 29, 2007 at 11:20 pm 2 comments

Putting my head back into the OPAC

A couple of months ago I questioned whether the quality of our library OPACs figures greatly into the overall satisfaction of our customers. Something I read in the New York Times this weekend: made me reflect on that post and wonder whether I was asking the right question. This is the what got me a’ponderin’:

Almost every Web film purveyor is planning to solve this bane of the modern culture consumer “too much choice” with some form of social networking. Recommendations, user reviews, friend lists and member pages are designed to help viewers determine which films they should watch.

When I read that, I found myself making these mental substitutions:


Almost every Web film purveyor library is planning to solve this bane of the modern culture consumer “too much choice” with some form of social networking. Recommendations, user reviews, friend lists and member pages are designed to help viewers library users determine which films they should watch books, cds and film they might enjoy next.

Now I’m wondering if the question I should be asking is, “how much value could we add to our customers’ experience, how much more engaging could libraries be, if our OPACS were integrated with social software and offered reviews, friend lists, member pages and (not incidentally) filters and recommendations?”

March 19, 2007 at 10:05 am 10 comments

User 2.0: Innovative Library Sites (Part 2 – Public Libraries)

As promised in my post on February 20th User 2.0 Innovative Library Sites (Part 1- Academic Libraries) here is Part 2 of the preliminary list of Innovative Library Sites – this time for public libraries. Thanks again to David M. Drados, PhD student at Rutgers University, SCILS, and Lynn Silipigni Connaway of OCLC. This list was compiled from suggestions of librarians from the dig_ref listserv, from journal articles, and librarian colleagues.

Again, this list is not meant to be definitive, is a work in progress designed to start a discussion. Your comments and suggestions are welcomed!

  • Ann Arbor District Library (MI) Uses the open source Drupal content management system with incorporates blogging, tagging, user comments, and RSS feeds. Its location page is tied into Google Maps.
  • Arlington Heights Memorial Library (IL)
    Features “Vlogs” – Video casts.
  • Atlantic City Public Library (NJ)
    Site features podcasts as well as RSS feeds.
  • Denver Public Library (CO)
    Has RSS feeds for library news and local events, podcasts, teen MySpace Account.
  • Goshen Public Library & Historical Society (NY)
    Maintains several blogs on various topics—book reviews, computers, library news, and also has a MySpace page.
  • Hennepin County Library (MN)
    Has blogs for library news and teens, RSS feeds built into the catalog along with user reviews/comments, a MySpace account and, podcasts.
  • Memorial Hall Library (MA)
    Library director maintains a Blog and site has a wiki with an accumulated collection of reference question called “Andover Answers,” teen podcasts, and a MySpace page and an online community calendars.
  • Mesa County Public Library District (CO)
    Has a library director blog, a staff “librarian’s love” blog, and links to online book clubs.
  • Salida Regional Library (CO)
    Links to Library Elf which allows users to track due dates on checked out items; local digital archive link, downloadable audio books, director (weekly) newspaper articles, and staff recommendations.
  • Stevens County Rural Library District (WA)
    Maintains a library news blog and a public wiki project designed to create a guide to Stevens County, including local history.
  • Westerville Public Library (OH)
    Features director, teen and adult services blogs, library Flickr and MySpace presence, RSS feeds, podcasts and videocasts, user rating of catalog items with links to Amazon, B&N, Novelist and Syndetics for reviews.
  • Worthington Libraries (OH)
    Has a teen blog along with an associated MySpace site.

February 25, 2007 at 11:23 am 6 comments

User 2.0: Innovative Library Sites (Part 1 – Academic Libraries)

You may recognize this illustration from the work published in Diffusion of Innovations (1995) by the late Everett Rogers. A few weeks ago I posted a query on the dig_ref listserv asking this savvy group of librarians interested in virtual reference services to nominate the library sites that are the most “innovative” in terms of integrating Web 2.0 / social software applications. I have also incorporated sites discussed in programs I attended at ALA Mid-Winter in Seattle (January 2007), suggested by colleagues, or noted in listservs or journal articles.

Today I am posting the preliminary list of Innovative Academic Libraries from these sources. Eash listing also has a very brief note about social software applications featured by the library’s website. I would like to thank David M. Dragos, Ph.D. student at Rutgers SCILS and Lynn Silipigni Connaway of OCLC for their help in compiling this list.

Again, this list is preliminary and not meant to be exhaustive, but rather to start a discussion. They are in alphabetical order.

I would like to invite you to leave a comment if your academic library is an innovator or if you know of others!

My next post (within the next day or so) will be Part 2 – Innovative Public Libraries.

Innovative Academic Library Websites

February 20, 2007 at 9:18 pm 12 comments

Topics in Librarianship: Social Software Literacy Course and ‘Top 25 Web 2.0 Search Engines’

Following up on our (Janie Herman and Robert Lackie) “The Latest and the Coolest–Technology Librarians Can Use” presentation and discussions at the Rutgers University MLIS Colloquium last night, I spoke with Assistant Professor Steve Garwood there about his upcoming course, “Topics in Librarianship: Social Software Literacy,” starting this summer.

We are always trying to highlight what Web 2.0 enthusiasts and experts are doing to help teach librarians and other information professionals how they can take advantage of this “software and information/communication medium,” and Steve’s course certainly fits the bill!

Steve has graciously allowed us to link to his draft version of the syllabus, giving us an idea of what will be covered and leading us to some interesting reading resources and the required equipment/software.

I thought this information and resources might spur on those of us who are might be thinking of offering a similar course or a series of workshops on “how technology is used in society to communicate information, ideas, practices, thoughts, and opinions and how this creates new communities and learning environments,” so I was glad that he was willing to share. Here are his objectives thus far:
* Identify and use popular social technologies for information collection, management, dissemination and collaboration.
* Discuss the historical and theoretical understanding of technologies of collaboration. * Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of technology on information services and instruction for diverse audiences.
* Explain what Web 2.0/Library 2.0 is – how it is different from the “regular” WWW, and why that shift is important to libraries & librarians;
* Generate ideas for the use of social software & programs at libraries and information agencies to improve services and to help staff work more effectively.

Sound interesting? Take a look at his entire draft syllabus here.

Also, one of his library school students emailed him very recently about the Web 2.0 topic that Steve and I think Library Garden readers will appreciate, too: The Online Education Databases’ “Top 25 Web 2.0 Search Engines,” published two days ago on their site. I really liked several of the mashup and Rich Internet Application Search Interfaces (RIAs) examples and descriptions, but visual search, social software, and audio/visual search examples are also provided.

Don’t you just love how librarians and library school students are willing to share?! Enjoy!

February 8, 2007 at 11:15 am

Blogging Live from Rutgers SCILS

Robert and I are here at Rutgers SCILS talking about all things 2.o and having a great time!
Marie Radford is here as well so it is a Library Garden reunion. Watch this space for links from the talk!

——————————————————————————
Hello again to everyone who attended our session last night –
the
first of several for Course 502 MLIS Colloquium (Spring 2007).
We were honored to be asked to speak and even more honored that so many people turned out on a sub-zero night to hear us talk.

As promised, here is a list of links from the talk. We would be interested in your feedback so please leave us comments or feel free to email us.

A Few Flickr’ing Libraries (and examples of what libraries can do with Flickr):

Flickr Groups for Librarians (especially those from NJ):

YouTube Must Sees:

We mentioned a lot of blogs and most (if not all) can be found on our blogroll, so take a peek at who we have listed and start reading. In particular, last night we focussed on Tame The Web and blyberg.net as well as the Ann Arbor District Library web site.

Two of the wikis mentioned last night included the Subject Guides at SJCPL and Princeton’s BookLovers wiki as well as the various wikis being put in to place for conferences. I meant to mention, but it slipped my mind, Library Success: A Best Practices Wiki. If you want to have a chance to play with a wiki and contribute content, this wiki is a great place to start.

Here also is the link to Robert’s article (in case you need it for future reference) and to the CJRLC Technology Group blog that has the list of links from their January 16th meeting.

I will end this post just as we ended our talk, by linking to the Web Trend Map created by Information Architects [pictured above]. As they say on their site:

The iA Trend Map shows all the big players, the current Internet trends and how they’re connected, using the Tokyo Metro map. It’s totally unscientific and almost useless, but definitely fun to look at.

Also make sure you read the 50 Loudest Web Sites of 2006 report and look at their Internet 2007 Predictions.

Note: I think that is everything that we promised to provide links to for future reference. If I forgot something let me know. Or if we mentioned something and you want more details, drop us a line.

February 7, 2007 at 8:04 pm 3 comments

Amazing (short) Web 2.0 Video

By way of Boing Boing

Check out this amazing video,”Web 2.0… the Machine is Us/ing Us,” created by Michael Wesch, Assistant Cultural Anthropology Professor at Kansas State University.

What a great way to kick off the first 5 minutes of any web 2.0 workshop or discussion!

February 6, 2007 at 9:47 pm 4 comments

2/8/07 Teleconference: 15 Minutes a Day!: All It Takes to Keep Up in a 2.0 World

Stephen Abram is dong a one-hour “teleconference on learning faster,” entitled “15 Minutes a Day! All It Takes to Keep Up in a 2.0 World with Stephen Abram” this coming Thursday, February 8th at 11 AM ET for librarians “who want to learn more about keeping up with the vast amount of information and change in our 2.0 world.” Sound interesting? Go to his blog post for more information and to register, and see the excerpt below to get you even more interested!:

“Stephen shares his techniques and tips for keeping up and increasing the capacity of library staff to add tools, resources, learning and insights. Learn about 2.0 and add tricks to your kitbag of processes and techniques for keeping up with important changes and opportunities.
The Benefits:
Learn:
- Tips & techniques for keeping up with the tsunami of information
- Tools for enhancing capacity to sort through information
- Pointers for determining which trends and pieces of information are important for the library world
- Some of the top trends that our speaker [Abram] is watching”

February 5, 2007 at 12:47 pm

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