Books still matter (and so do school libraries)

May 13, 2010 at 6:37 pm 2 comments

by April Bunn

Times are rough for librarians in New Jersey. In the education world, librarian positions are being cut at an astronomical rate due to severe cuts in state aid.

I have been quiet here on Library Garden lately because I am part of the statistics- my position was cut- leaving our school without a librarian. I have been busy advocating for our positions with my teacher’s association and the New Jersey Association of School Librarians.

While I’m shocked at what happened to school budgets in the Garden State in such a short period of time, I’m finding a shimmer of hope in the cover story of the May issue of the New Jersey Education Assocation (NJEA) Review: Keeping Dewey relevant in the digital age: Why books still matter by East Hanover teacher and author Ralph Rabb.

Rabb argues that with our help, books, in their original printed form, will inspire  literate, passionate readers. His primary concern is that students are doing their reading online and not picking up hard-copy text enough. The new term for all this online reading is called being  “e-literate”.

I was immediately hooked into the article because Rabb describes one of my major reasons for loving libraries since I was very young- the SMELL of books- “It’s absolute olfactory heaven.” He calls libraries “temples built for the love of books” and suggests that teachers need to take their students on field trips to the great libraries, such as the New York Public Library and the Library of Congress.

I take my youngest students each year on a trip to our public library and their excitement is contagious. And while my library is not a NYPL, it is still my temple and it’s still a baby. I’m extra sad to see it close* next year since I “built” it from scratch. The prior superintendent had a vision for the school that included a large library with an adjoining technology lab and they were dedicated in September of 2005. She’d be sad to see this happening.

*I said it was “closing” next year, which I consider the case, but my Board doesn’t see it that way- they think teachers taking their students down to “pick out books”  and volunteers shelving books is keeping it alive. By the way, the technology department experienced no budget cuts.

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Entry filed under: AASL, Education, Funding, Future of Libraries, Libraries, Library as Place, School Librarians, School Libraries. Tags: , , , , , , .

Team TEDxNJLibraries Congratulations to Peter Bromberg!

2 Comments

  • 1. The Eeyore Librarian  |  May 14, 2010 at 12:21 am

    So sorry, we’re struggling in my state as well. Struggling and beginning to engage in a long-term solution to school library funding. http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=118811248140080#!/group.php?gid=118811248140080

    Good luck with your fight.

  • 2. Lesley  |  May 14, 2010 at 10:51 am

    So sorry to hear about your postion being cut! School librarians are very important, so much more than just a planning period for classroom teachers.

    I’ve enjoyed your blog, and hope that you’ll be able to stay in the field and continue writing here!


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