Archive for February, 2007

2 Great Posts on DRM

I was doing a reference question and in the course of finding the answer I found 2 great posts on DRM:

I will be reading both these posts again more carefully tonight or tomorrow as I only had time to quickly scan them while on the desk. Here are a few highlights that made me know in an instant that they are bookmark worthy:

Graham states at the outset of his post:

In the Web 2.0 world everything makes or breaks on interoperability…or sharing. Sharing of thoughts, ideas, media, code, and work. If any point that openness is constricted, the whole system breaks down. Without this environment there would be no mashups, and many of the online services we rely on today would not exist.
Just imagine if all that open interoperability went away and we were back to the old days of closed APIs and closed systems. That’s what DRM does.

Then just before his call for action, asks a crucial question:

Steve Jobs claims he wants to eliminate DRM. The music executives claim to want what’s best for the consumer and their bottom line. These two things are not mutually exclusive. How about trusting your customers instead of assuming that every one of us is a criminal?

Douma, along the same lines, opens his post with this:

Let’s be frank for a moment. Digital Rights Management (DRM) is antitrust and anti-radical trust. Personally, I’ve never been a fan of the iTunes music store because of its DRM. Why should you pay $1 for a track loaded with DRM when you can download it for free from a torrent with no restrictions at all? Why should anyone pay to be restricted?

And concludes with this:

This week’s call from Steve Jobs is long overdue. I hope that more visionaries like this guy can convince the world that there is more money to be made in trusting people than there is in restricting them.

February 12, 2007 at 3:57 pm 10 comments

Eastwood and Beethoven

Just reporting on yet another busy weekend at MPOW. I love my job in general, but at this very moment I am so incredibly invigorated (most likely from the music) and in love with what I do that I just have to write about it. We just wrapped up a concert in our community room called The Many Moods of Beethoven. It was performed by a chamber quarter from the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra and it was standing room only (with many also choosing to sit on the floor so as not to miss a note). My headcount was 180+, which is great for a cold Sunday afternoon in February. The musicians told the story of Beethoven’s life through his music and the educational aspect was equal to the musical aspect.

In contrast to the classical music, we have also have a film series occurring at the library this weekend and for the next few weeks called “Clint Out West”– it is a retrospective of Clint Eastwood’s films. The attendance numbers are not as high for the Beethoven program (ranging from 30-60+ per film screening), but numbers aren’t always the measure of a successful program. According to Susan Conlon, the organizer of the series, those in attendance are extremely engaged in the discussions being led by film historian Bruce Lawton and the series is not only entertaining but also educational.

Last weekend PPL hosted the Princeton Environmental Film Festival, a new and very successful venture which was entirely the initiative of Kai Marshall-Otto, a teen volunteer here at the library. Kai, who is also Co-President of Princeton High School Environmental Club, worked tirelessly to organize and coordinate the weekend. The festival offered 5 days of films and speakers on environmental issues and had a total attendance exceeding 1,000 for the weekend. Susan Conlon, our Teen Librarian extraordinaire, was the staff liaison for the festival and worked closely with Kai every step of the way to create a dynamic and exciting weekend. As she noted in her program report:

This program brought in all ages, and while adults represented the greatest % in attendance, it was very much noticed and appreciated that teens were the catalyst for this event, and were represented in the audience, and also helping to facilitate discussions.

We have programs and events daily, sometimes several in a day, and in the hustle to get everything done I do not usually have the time to sit and reflect on how wonderful it feels to work at a place that provides educational opportunities of such a wide variety to all who wish to attend. Today I am taking the time to reflect and it feels good.

February 11, 2007 at 4:59 pm

Great Preconference! Creating A Staff Development Plan

Don’t miss this great CLENE-RT Preconference at ALA annual!
Creating A Staff Development Plan

Friday, June 22, 2007,
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Sponsored by the CLENE Round Table
[CLENE: The Continuing Library Education Network and Exchange Round Table]

DESCRIPTION
In today’s environment, library staff have to work harder than ever to stay informed and keep up with changes. How can libraries encourage all staff to continually develop their skills? A systematic staff development plan can address the learning needs of library staff and increase their effectiveness on the job.

This half-day session is a step-by-step introduction to the process of addressing the issue of staff development from needs assessment through planning. Do you need a staff development plan?

Speakers: Cal Shepard, SOLINET
Tickets: CLENE-RT Member: $110; ALA Member: $130; Non-Member: $180
Registration: http://tinyurl.com/yq4gst
————————————————————————–
NOTE: If you plan on coming and you’re not a CLENE-RT member, why not take this opportunity to join? It’s only $20 to add CLENE to your ALA membership, and joining CLENE gives you many benefits including… wait for it… preferred professional membership in the American Management Association!

Interested? Click here for details: http://www.ala.org/ala/clenert/clenemem/membership.htm

February 9, 2007 at 3:40 pm 3 comments

Topics in Librarianship: Social Software Literacy Course and ‘Top 25 Web 2.0 Search Engines’

Following up on our (Janie Herman and Robert Lackie) “The Latest and the Coolest–Technology Librarians Can Use” presentation and discussions at the Rutgers University MLIS Colloquium last night, I spoke with Assistant Professor Steve Garwood there about his upcoming course, “Topics in Librarianship: Social Software Literacy,” starting this summer.

We are always trying to highlight what Web 2.0 enthusiasts and experts are doing to help teach librarians and other information professionals how they can take advantage of this “software and information/communication medium,” and Steve’s course certainly fits the bill!

Steve has graciously allowed us to link to his draft version of the syllabus, giving us an idea of what will be covered and leading us to some interesting reading resources and the required equipment/software.

I thought this information and resources might spur on those of us who are might be thinking of offering a similar course or a series of workshops on “how technology is used in society to communicate information, ideas, practices, thoughts, and opinions and how this creates new communities and learning environments,” so I was glad that he was willing to share. Here are his objectives thus far:
* Identify and use popular social technologies for information collection, management, dissemination and collaboration.
* Discuss the historical and theoretical understanding of technologies of collaboration. * Demonstrate knowledge of the impact of technology on information services and instruction for diverse audiences.
* Explain what Web 2.0/Library 2.0 is – how it is different from the “regular” WWW, and why that shift is important to libraries & librarians;
* Generate ideas for the use of social software & programs at libraries and information agencies to improve services and to help staff work more effectively.

Sound interesting? Take a look at his entire draft syllabus here.

Also, one of his library school students emailed him very recently about the Web 2.0 topic that Steve and I think Library Garden readers will appreciate, too: The Online Education Databases’ “Top 25 Web 2.0 Search Engines,” published two days ago on their site. I really liked several of the mashup and Rich Internet Application Search Interfaces (RIAs) examples and descriptions, but visual search, social software, and audio/visual search examples are also provided.

Don’t you just love how librarians and library school students are willing to share?! Enjoy!

February 8, 2007 at 11:15 am

Blogging Live from Rutgers SCILS

Robert and I are here at Rutgers SCILS talking about all things 2.o and having a great time!
Marie Radford is here as well so it is a Library Garden reunion. Watch this space for links from the talk!

——————————————————————————
Hello again to everyone who attended our session last night –
the
first of several for Course 502 MLIS Colloquium (Spring 2007).
We were honored to be asked to speak and even more honored that so many people turned out on a sub-zero night to hear us talk.

As promised, here is a list of links from the talk. We would be interested in your feedback so please leave us comments or feel free to email us.

A Few Flickr’ing Libraries (and examples of what libraries can do with Flickr):

Flickr Groups for Librarians (especially those from NJ):

YouTube Must Sees:

We mentioned a lot of blogs and most (if not all) can be found on our blogroll, so take a peek at who we have listed and start reading. In particular, last night we focussed on Tame The Web and blyberg.net as well as the Ann Arbor District Library web site.

Two of the wikis mentioned last night included the Subject Guides at SJCPL and Princeton’s BookLovers wiki as well as the various wikis being put in to place for conferences. I meant to mention, but it slipped my mind, Library Success: A Best Practices Wiki. If you want to have a chance to play with a wiki and contribute content, this wiki is a great place to start.

Here also is the link to Robert’s article (in case you need it for future reference) and to the CJRLC Technology Group blog that has the list of links from their January 16th meeting.

I will end this post just as we ended our talk, by linking to the Web Trend Map created by Information Architects [pictured above]. As they say on their site:

The iA Trend Map shows all the big players, the current Internet trends and how they’re connected, using the Tokyo Metro map. It’s totally unscientific and almost useless, but definitely fun to look at.

Also make sure you read the 50 Loudest Web Sites of 2006 report and look at their Internet 2007 Predictions.

Note: I think that is everything that we promised to provide links to for future reference. If I forgot something let me know. Or if we mentioned something and you want more details, drop us a line.

February 7, 2007 at 8:04 pm 3 comments

Join me in the CJRLC Tech Challenge

The Central Jersey Regional Library Cooperative (CJRLC) has issued a Learning 2.o challenge to anyone who works in a CJRLC member library. This is a great chance to learn new skills and I hope others will join me in taking the CJRLC Tech Challenge.

I have already completed over 90% o of the items on the challenge, but I am taking it anyway and giving it my own twist. For instance, instead of creating another blogger blog I set up a WordPress blog called Janie’s CJRLC Challenge Blog

I have been meaning to learn more about WordPress for several months and just never got around to it. This is the perfect reason for me to finally play with WordPress as well as other new technologies and tools that I just never seem to get around to using.

For instance, I have explored LibraryThing and Squidoo and know what they are what they do, but never used them extensively. This will be my chance. I am also going to look for new tools and sites and then blog about them as I find them.

Since starting the challenge yesterday I already explored a new to me service called SplashCast and created my first embedded SplashCast on my new blog. Go over and have a look. I think SplashCast has great potential and I am glad to have found it.

February 7, 2007 at 11:49 am 3 comments

Amazing (short) Web 2.0 Video

By way of Boing Boing

Check out this amazing video,”Web 2.0… the Machine is Us/ing Us,” created by Michael Wesch, Assistant Cultural Anthropology Professor at Kansas State University.

What a great way to kick off the first 5 minutes of any web 2.0 workshop or discussion!

February 6, 2007 at 9:47 pm 4 comments

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