What Libraries Can Learn from ‘Snakes on a Plane’

April 15, 2006 at 10:02 pm 6 comments

OK, so even CNN (search for ‘Snake Appeal;’ video clip aired Apr. 14) has picked up the story about how bloggers are affecting Hollywood. . . Excitement about the truly simple title and plot of the forthcoming movie Snakes on a Plane is amazing; use your favorite search engine to find “Snakes on a plane blog” (warning: foul language ensues). Libraries truly have much to learn from this phenomenon!

Imagine your library users getting this excited about your collection, facility, or services. . .

  • They understand what you’re offering right from its title, and

  • They help create it, modify it, and market it to others

What could be better?! Somehow the traditional model of libraries — in which we collect stuff and then loan it out to folks only via strict rule-governed interpersonal or technological exchanges — is not this exciting. The concept of Snakes on a Plane is simple and easy for everyone to understand. In fact, it simultaneously works on several levels (perhaps for different “users”) — the literal, the horrific, the ironic, and the twisted. It engenders creativity, personalization, and a multidirectional flow of discussion. Apparently, it spawns dynamic change and improvements, and gives “users” a feeling of ownership and co-creation whether they influenced the final product or not. Talk about customer service lessons!

About these ads

Entry filed under: Uncategorized. Tags: .

On underwear, beanies, and other fashion statements… Tip #2: Do daily walk-throughs

6 Comments

  • 1. The Shifted Librarian  |  April 16, 2006 at 1:50 pm

    This is one of the emerging themes in the ALA Library 2.0 Course Michael Stephens and I will be teaching online next month. We believe librarians need to better understand how these social, online tools generate community and spontaneous grassroots movements. We need to see the Flickr READ posters as a way to tap into this shared excitement, rather than as a violation of our copyright!

  • 2. The Shifted Librarian  |  April 16, 2006 at 1:50 pm

    This is one of the emerging themes in the ALA Library 2.0 Course Michael Stephens and I will be teaching online next month. We believe librarians need to better understand how these social, online tools generate community and spontaneous grassroots movements. We need to see the Flickr READ posters as a way to tap into this shared excitement, rather than as a violation of our copyright!

  • 3. The Shifted Librarian  |  April 16, 2006 at 1:50 pm

    This is one of the emerging themes in the ALA Library 2.0 Course Michael Stephens and I will be teaching online next month. We believe librarians need to better understand how these social, online tools generate community and spontaneous grassroots movements. We need to see the Flickr READ posters as a way to tap into this shared excitement, rather than as a violation of our copyright!

  • 4. Cathy  |  April 18, 2006 at 9:22 pm

    Best. Library. Blog. Entry. Header. EVER!

  • 5. Cathy  |  April 18, 2006 at 9:22 pm

    Best. Library. Blog. Entry. Header. EVER!

  • 6. Cathy  |  April 18, 2006 at 9:22 pm

    Best. Library. Blog. Entry. Header. EVER!


Creative Commons

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
Disclaimer: The thoughts expressed on this blog are those of the authors and are not intended to reflect the views of our employers.

A Note on the history of posts

Please note that all Library Garden posts dated earlier than September 13,2009 originally appeared on our Blogger site. These posts have been imported to this site as a convenience when searching the entire site for content.

If you are interested in seeing the original post, with formatting and comments in tact, please bring up the original post at our old Blogger site.

Thanks for reading Library Garden!

wordpress
visitors

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 38 other followers

%d bloggers like this: